Why dogs smell even after bath

Bathing is essential for dogs not only to keep them clean, but also to remove their unpleasant smells after days. Dogs are playful, and they enjoy playing outdoor more than any other pets. As they play and roll on the grass, they tend to get dirty with all the dirt and debris trapped in their hair. Thus, regular bathing helps to maintain their clean hair and skin. Although there are many factors that determine how often dog owners should bathe their dogs, when dogs start to stink, it is probably a good time for them to take a bath. However, some dogs still smell even after baths, how so?

If just within hours or a couple of days after the bath your dog still smells, check if he has played indoor or outdoor. If he mostly stays outdoor, it could be something dead or a skunk that makes him smell. On the other hand, if he mainly stays indoor, the causes may relate to some medical conditions that you need to consider. In general, check with the veterinarian regardless of where he has been, either outdoor or indoor. Usually having a bad smell even after baths is not a good sign, and thus bringing him to the vet for a general check-up is highly recommended in order to timely detect any health issues.

One potential issue is an ear infection

If your dog’s ears are infected with bacteria, it could be the cause for the stink. Bathing in this case does not help alleviate the problem but sometimes it even worsens the infection. Your dog may tend to shake his head or scratch his ears, so this can be a sign for you to give him a check in the ears. You can take him to the veterinarian to see if your dog has an ear infection. Usually the vet will give him a treatment and let you know how to bathe him to keep the ears dry.

It could also be dental hygiene issue

Bad odor can be produced by infected gums or decayed teeth, and sometimes it is difficult for you to recognize this. Thus, regular vet visit may help you identify the issue in a timely manner. In other cases, bad odor is caused by factors other than dental diseases. Although it is best to consult a vet for the best solutions, you can also do the followings at home to reduce your dog’s bad breath: give your dog better-quality food, and brush his teeth regularly with toothpaste formulated specifically for dogs.

Another potential cause is inflamed skin

When your dog’s skin is inflamed, it starts to secrete excessive oils. Usually the dog’s skin secretes natural oils to keep the hair healthy and shiny, but excessive oils create body odor. In this case, the vet can prescribe special types of shampoo that helps to restore your dog’s skin and hair condition. In addition, a conditioner may also be prescribed as a combo with the shampoo.

There are many other potential causes of bad odor even after baths. All the items listed above are just few common ones. The general rule is whenever you see an abnormal sign, which is bad odor in this case, you should bring your dog to a vet for diagnosis and prescription.

 

As indicated earlier, sometimes it is difficult for dog owners to recognize where exact the inflammation or infection is; thus, visiting the vet is a must for the best advice and solution. If you cannot take your dog to the vet right away, you can try checking the source of the odor, in other words, where the smell comes from.

In order for the odor not to transfer to your furniture in house, you may cover your furniture with towels or blankets so that the odor does not stick around stuff in your house. Last but not least, no matter what makes your dog stink, do not give up on giving him baths regularly. We believe that as soon as you take your dog to the vet to identify the problem, your vet will definitely assist you on how to improve your dog’s condition.

When to bathe dog after flea treatment

Having a dog pet is one of most enjoyable things in life. Whenever you have a bad day, your dog will cheer you up with his energy and positive attitudes. However, when it comes to the flea season, it’ll take you some effort to keep your little friend free from fleas and ticks. Flea treatment is commonly applied not only for treatment of fleas but also for preventative care. One question that we usually receive from many dog owners is that: does bathing routine get affected by the flea treatment? When can we bathe dogs after the treatment? This question is totally understandable because although we put on flea treatment on our dogs, they are totally unaware of this. This does not stop them from playing and rolling around, and obviously would become dirty and stinky over time. So how can we manage their bathing routine along with their flea treatments?

In general, wait at least 48 hours to bathe your dog after the flea treatment.

There are many ways that we can use for flea treatment. One way is to use topical cream, and most cream takes a period of time to start doing its job. Therefore, the minimum time you should wait is until the cream has dried. Most creams require at least 48 hours waiting before you can bathe your dog. However, some creams indicate different amount of time, so you can always check the label to see the instructions.

What if you use flea collar? Are there any differences? Well, not really. Although some collars are waterproof and it is fine to bathe your dog even with the collar on, it still takes 12 to 48 hours for the flea prevention to be in full effect. Thus, to be safe, wait 48 hours to bathe your dog even when you use flea collars.

What if my dog gets super dirty? What should I do?

As we mentioned earlier, dogs are unaware of the fact that they are under flea treatment. Putting on a flea collar on them does not mean they would stop playing and rolling around, which means nothing can prevent them from getting all the dirt and debris trapped in their hair. In this case that washing is a must, you can clean your dog using a wet cloth and wipe the dirty area only. This prevents washing away the topical cream you have applied. You should not use dry shampoo because it will absorb the flea medication as much as water does. Another tip to remove sticky substances on your dog’s hair is to use coconut oil. This works great on their skins, and does not wash away a large area of flea medication.

If you are worried about cleaning dirty spots while your dog is on flea medication, one preventative step is to keep them indoor for a few days, until the medication has fully gone under effect. This not only helps your dog stay out of dirt, but also lessens your worries about cleaning their dirty hair.

Few things to remember…

In case you accidentally wash away the flea medication, do not reapply without consulting a veterinarian first. Reapplying may overdose the medication, and this does no good to your dog. If you think the medication does not work and you want to switch to another type, consult your vet before doing so.

Another thing to remember is that do not forget to use non-stripping shampoo for dog bathing after the flea treatment. Although you may have waited for a few days to bathe your dog, it is recommended that you use non-stripping shampoo, which does not wash away the medication. By doing this, your dog is still protected against flea and ticks, as the medication is not affected by the soap.

Overall, dog bathing while flea treatment is not impossible, but it requires a bit more caution and attention. If you are unsure how long you should wait til you give your dog a bath again, check with the vet or read the medicine’s label for instructions. Remember not to overdose your dog with various types of flea medication, and pay attention to the type of shampoo you use for him. As long as you follow these general guidelines, you’ll be good to go!

How to give a bath to a dog that hates baths

You are going to give your dog a bath, and you are excited because you know your dog (and you) will love it, because which dog doesn’t like bathing? Dogs love water, and of course they will enjoy a bath.

But, that is just what we thought we know. In reality, not all dog enjoys bath times. Some dogs even hate it. Some dog owners struggle with taking their dogs to baths because they are constantly fleeing away, and becoming super stressed. Obviously you cannot just leave your dog stink, can you? So what are the ways that you can try?

First, let’s talk briefly about why dogs dislike baths. We all know that dogs can swim, and they love swimming, so definitely it is not the water that they are afraid of.

However, when they swim, they have total control of their body and movement, while in a bath, you are the water-controller. This is the factor that makes them nervous and stressed because they cannot control the water, and the situation seems to be unpredictable and surprising to them. Therefore, it is the uncertainty of what is going to happen that makes them hate baths. Good news is that your dog will not hate this forever if you know that way to change it.

Get to know the bathing area and make positive associations

One of the most important thing is to have your dog get used to the bathing area. In order for your dog to feel at ease in the bathroom, take time to introduce him to the area and make positive associations with it. There are few ways that you can create positive feelings for your dog, one of which is to feed your dog in the bathing area.

Instead of feeding the meals in the normal feeding area, you can try switching to the bathing area so that whenever it comes to meals, your dog knows where to go and eventually becomes acquainted with the bathing area. After a while, your dog starts to have positive association with the place, and will be more comfortable being present in that area. In addition, you can give treats to your dog or toys to play in the bathing area to increase and enhance the positive association.

Don’t forget the cue word “bath”

Now your dog has got used to the bathing area, let’s get him used to your cue word every time you tell him that we are going to take a bath. Remember that dogs do not like surprises or uncertainties (which make him dislike baths in the first place)? This is how you can change it.

By associating this cue word “bath” with a treat, your dog will eventually learn that it is bath time, and bath time does no harm to him. There are many benefits for this practice. First, your dog is no longer surprised when it comes to bath time because now he understands your announcement, and he has time to get ready and mentally prepared.

Secondly, with a treat, your dog will also have a positive attitude toward bath time, which helps him relax and release the tension. Last but not least, you are also benefited because you do not need to chase him around for bath time anymore, which is stressful for both of you. Let your dog get used to the command, and lead him steadily instead of chasing.

Preparing for bath time well and avoid surprises during bath time

There are a few ways you can do to prepare for your dog’s bath time. One way is to take him for a walk. This will help your dog to release any piled up energy, and be more comfortable and obedient during bath time.

The water for bathing is also important, so it should be properly prepared. You should use warm water instead of cold water because warm water not only makes your dog more comfortable but also decreases the chance of getting panic. Thus, take time to prepare the water in advance to make sure it is not too hot or cold, but at a comfortably warm level.

During the bath time, try spray a bit of water on your dog’s feet for him to get used to the water slowly. You can use a pitcher to scoop up some water and pour slowly on your dog. It is highly recommended that you use a washcloth to wipe the facial area, as opposed to spraying or pouring water directly on his face.

This is an extremely sensitive area, so a stream of water may cause stress or surprise for your little friend, which no one wants. Thus, in the case that your dog initially dislikes bathing, pay close attention to this stage because you may not want to surprise him with water.

So, with all these tips, we believe that you can make your dog feel more comfortable during bath time, and this time to both of you would be more tolerable and more enjoyable.

how to bathe and groom a dog at home

Having a pet dog is fun and exciting, but in order to keep your furry friend in a good shape and good hygiene, dog grooming is a must. There are many services for dog grooming and bathing nowadays, but most of the time these services cost a lot of money. We all know that dog grooming must be done regularly, so it can be unaffordable for many dog owners to use these services. So here we are writing this article to show you how to bathe and groom your dog at home.

Bathing and grooming your dog at home yourself can not only save you quite a lot of money, but also give both of you a good time together. Although it seems like there are many things dog owners need to know about bathing and grooming, it is not that complicated after all. Once you get used to it, every thing is in your control. Now let’s take a closer look at some steps and tips.

Let’s start with a nice bath

Giving your dog regular baths not only maintains his hygiene, but also helps us to detect any abnormalities on his hair or skin. However, not all dogs gets along with bathing, and in those cases, it is difficult for you just to control his behavior, let alone having an enjoyable time. Therefore, there are a few tips for preparation that you can do to make bath times more comfortable for both of you.

introduce your friend to the bathing area.

First, gradually introduce your friend to the bathing area. Although dogs are not afraid of water, when taking a bath, it is you who control the water stream, which makes them nervous because they have no control of the water pouring on their bodies. Thus, it is important for them to get used to the bathing area so that they no longer feel surprised whenever you take them to the tub.

You can start giving meals in the bathing area or giving treats to your dog so that he gets a positive association with the place. After that, you can move on to introducing tools and equipment you will use for bathing such as brushes, towels, wash clothes, and so on to your dog. Don’t forget to give him treats every time you introduce him to a new tool. The general rule is that you want to enhance his positive association with the bathing activity, from the place to the tools, so that he feels comfortable being around it.

prepare the water

Next, you can prepare the water. Make sure that it is lukewarm water instead of cold water. Cold water tends to make your dog less comfortable and anxious. When taking your dog to the bathtub or the bathing area, do this slowly so that your dog has time to adapt to the surroundings. During bath time, you can use a pitcher to scoop up water and pour it on your dog. This is one of the nice ways to give him a gentle stream of water without surprising him. For the facial area, be gentle, and don’t let water get into his eyes, ears, or nose. It is highly recommended that you use a washcloth to wipe this area instead of spraying water directly.

After the bath, use a soft towel to dry him off, then you can just let your dog air dry naturally.

Do-it-yourself dog grooming at home: How to do it

Now your dog is cleaned, you may want to move on to the grooming. In fact, you can do bathing and grooming separately. Each activity takes time, so if you do not have spare time, it is totally normal to bath him on one day, and do grooming on the other day. Grooming is also a fun activity to do for your dog, and it is not really complicated.

First, let’s talk about brushing and clipping hair. Each dog breed needs to be brushed and groomed differently. In general, short-haired breeds need less brushing and grooming, while long-haired breeds require more care and grooming as the hair tends to trap in dirt and debris. For grooming, some dog owners use scissors to trim the dog’s hair, but you can also use a dog clipper for home use, which is easy, fast, and convenient to use at home. There is a great variety of dog clippers in the market that you can choose from, and most of them are simple to handle and control.

After the hair, you can move on to check out your dog’s nails, ears, and teeth. Long nails need to be trimmed regularly. Make sure that you check with a vet to trim the nails correctly. There is a pinky area on the nails, where the blood vessels are, so you need to make sure you’re not cutting into that pinkish area.

For the ears, all you need to do is to give a general check up to see if there is any abnormal signs. If everything looks good, leave them as they are. Do not apply any products on the ears to avoid irritation for your dog.

Last but not least, give a brief look at the teeth. Our goal is to see if there is any problem or unhealthy signs so that we can consult a vet in a timely manner.

In short, these are just the general guidelines for dog bathing and grooming at home. Depending on your dog’s breed, more specific guidelines need to be followed. To know if your dog has any special skin or hair conditions, do not hesitate to consult a vet. Bathing and grooming at home is fun and cost-effective, but don’t forget that it should be done correctly and appropriately. We hope you have good times together, and stay healthy!

How to bathe an aggressive dog

Dog bathing is extremely important in maintaining the dog’s hygiene. However, not all dogs are comfortable with taking a bath at the first place. Some dogs are anxious, or even aggressive when it comes to bathing. So how can we make bathing more tolerable for both? What are the things we need to know if our dogs behave aggressively?

Slowly introduce your dog to the bathing area first

Most dogs are anxious in the bathtub because they do not like being surrounded by walls or anything similar. Thus, if they are unfamiliar with the bathing area, high chance is that they will get aggressive and anxious trying to get out when you take them there. So, it is recommended that you introduce them first, and give them time to get used to the surroundings and all the tools you are going to use during bath time.

First, you can try putting meals in the bathing area. Whenever it’s meal time, your little friend will go there for food, and eventually start getting closer and more comfortable being in that place. This is one of the ways that we can create a positive association between something your dog likes (such as food) and the bathing area. Additionally, you can give him treats and compliments whenever he is in the area to enhance the positive association.

Teach your dog the cue word “bath”

When dogs are aggressive during bath time, it does not mean that they are afraid of water. As we all know, dogs can swim and they do enjoy swimming. So what is the difference? The difference is that when swimming, dogs have a total control of their body and how they contact with the water, whereas during bath time, it is you who control the water flows. In addition, the bathing area is usually surrounded by walls, which makes it more difficult for your dog to escape, thus making him anxious and worried. It is the unknown of what is going to happen makes them feel uncomfortable for a bath. Keeping this in mind, we want to show you the next thing you can do: teach your dog the cue word “bath”. Again, the idea here is still to create positive association with bathing, from the surrounding to the voice command. Like any other tricks, you should give him treats as a reward after telling him that we are going to take a bath and taking him to the bathing area. After a while, your dog will start getting used to both the surroundings and the word, helping him no longer surprised whenever you take him there.

Getting ready for the bath

Whenever you think your dog is ready for the bath without being too anxious, it is time for you to get ready as well. You may want to prepare everything in advance so that you and your dog do not spend more time than necessary in the bath.

You can start with preparing the water. Make sure that the water is warm, as opposed to cold or hot water. Warm water is soothing, which helps your dog relax and release the tension. If you use the bathtub, fill few inches of water, but not too full. A full tub of water may not be so pleasant for those that dislike water. If a handheld shower is not favorable for your dog, try using a pitcher to scoop up and pour over him.

When using shampoo, be gentle and cautious, especially with the facial area. Most of the time, the aggressive dogs are those that are sensitive, so careless use of shampoo may make your dog become aggressive again. You can try using a washcloth or a towel to wipe his face instead of pouring water over it. If possible, try using aromatherapy such as using lavender or wood scented shampoo. Aromatherapy works well in calming your dog and may help reducing his aggressive behavior.

Last few things to remember…

During dog bathing, do not forget that you and your dog’s safety is top priority. The bathroom is usually slippery due to the steam and the water, so our recommendation is to place a non-slip mat in the bathroom to prevent slipping. If your dog is aggressive, you should try putting on a muzzle to avoid injury or being bitten by your dog.

For the first few times, if necessary, you can use some sort of restraints to keep your dog in place. A leash can be a good idea. After a while, you do not need to continue using the leash if your dog has become comfortable with bathing.

Last but not least, consult a vet anytime if you notice any abnormal sign, or in case your dog’s aggression does not alleviate. It is also recommended that you see a vet to make sure you know your dog’s skin conditions and if he has any allergies. With that, we hope that you now have some good tips on hands to make dog bathing more enjoyable.

 

 

How Often Can I Bath My Dog

For many dog owners, from the inexperienced to the experienced, dog

grooming has been a very familiar term, in which dog bathing is included. Just like us humans, dogs also need bathing in order to maintain their hygiene, as well as to perform an overall check for any abnormalities.

So here comes the question: How often can I bathe my dog?

And the answer is: it depends! Probably the true question is not how often you can bathe your dog, but it is how often you should do it.

The rule of thumb is that too high or too low frequency is never good for your furry friend. In general, it is recommended that you bathe your dog at least once every three months. Of course, you can totally wash your dog more often, such as once every other week, but make sure that you use an appropriate type of shampoo that does not dry your dog’s hair and damage his skin. To be more specific than this general guideline, let’s take a look at a few factors that determine the frequency of dog bathing.

Hair length:

Your dog’s hair type plays an important in determining how often you should bathe your dog. If your dog has long hair, it is more likely for dirt and debris to get trapped in the hair. Thus, it easily gets grimy. In this case, you may want to bathe your dog more often. On the other hand, if your dog is a short-haired breed, it may not need to be bathed often since the hair is less susceptible to dirt. Before giving your dog a bath, you can do a quick brushing to remove excess hairs and tangles. Sometimes, even when your dog has short hair, those tangles trap in dirt and make the hair grimy. When that happens, you may want to wash your dog. So watch out for those tangles as well, because they somewhat determine if your dog needs a bath.

Does your dog play outdoor often?

If he or she does, then you would want to wash him or her more often. Obviously, when playing outdoors, your little friend is more exposed to dirt than when playing indoors. Dogs are energetic, so they tend to dig holes or roll around a lot on the grass, so if you want to keep them clean (but also to keep your house clean when bringing them inside), you can give them proper bath times. On the contrary, if your dog mostly stays indoors and enjoys time in-house, you may not need to wash him very often, in order not to damage his skin or hair.

Does your dog have allergies or special skin conditions?

If you answer “yes” to the question above, then the frequency of dog bathing really depends on your dog’s conditions. In some cases, they may need more frequent bathing, while in other cases, bathing too often does more harm than good. For allergies and skin conditions, you need to check with a veterinarian to make sure you know well which routine works best for your dog. Additionally, pay attention to the type of shampoo you use on your dog as well. You may look for hypoallergenic types so that they will not damage your dog’s skin or worsen his conditions.

So, in general, there is no exact answer on how many times you should bathe your dog per week or per month. You can look at the factors above to determine if your dog needs frequent bathing. Another way that you can do to decide is your own judgement. If you think that your dog starts to smell bad, or his hair starts to get grimy, give him a good bath time.

Another thing that you should keep in mind is that your dog’s skin does produce natural oils to maintain the hair growth, and your dog totally needs this. Therefore, too much washing may eliminate these natural oils, which eventually will damage your dog’s hair and skin. So, even when you want your dog to have great smell, be considerate when giving your dog a bath and do not overdo it!

Conclusion

In sum, it may seem like there is too much to consider when it comes to just dog bathing, let alone dog grooming. However, we all want the best thing for our little friends, so be persistent. It takes time to fully understand your dog and his health, and after a while, you’ll start to get a hang of it and you can totally rely on your judgement to determine how and how often you want to bathe your dog. Don’t forget that bath time is fun time as well, so take your time to enjoy it as much as your furry friend does.